Sunday, December 18, 2011

Aggregation Post, Take Two

Two archival posts in one day?  Either I'm lazy, or there's a lot of awesome stuff on this internet.

First, some random magical items from From the Sorcerer's Skull.  Excellent for, well, anything — random merchant trinkets, oddities at a Goblin Market (or this Goblin Market, or even the original Goblin Market), something for the Swap Meet, and so forth.  I'm sure the Terrible Old Man sells them, as may Octoscholars, with the typical risk of cursing and horrible side effects.

And then there's this offering from The Tao of D&D.  The author discusses the American Constitution in relation to the typical roleplaying epochs explored — as he says, the Colonial era is frequently ignored, trapped between the Renaissance and Victoriana.  He further states that this is an incredible poverty, as the world is aflame with revolution and the people are becoming unified in a way that forms the bridge between the medieval world and the modern one.

He further mentions that this revolution falls somewhere between the old and new view of the gods.  In fact, making this new society might involve killing the gods themselves.

Whether you agree or disagree with all of the author's points, you should read "Constitution."  I keep saying a revolutionary setting would be interesting, and the idea of killing the gods themselves ties in nicely with E. M. Lamb's post on religions in RPGs.

2 comments:

  1. Glad you liked the "Random Magical Junk" post. Gorgonmilk also instigated a crowdsourced Goblin Market.

    I think a 18th-Century/early 19th-century setting would be interesting. Matt over at the Land of Nod would talking about one at one point, I wrote a post in that direction, and there was somebody else too. I've seen one published rpg, but its pretty unmined territory, all things considered.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I linked without looking; the second Goblin Market link is a link to a place that links to the Goblin Market you mentioned.

    I'll fix it just to be thorough.

    Now, if I never type "link" again it'll be too soon.

    ReplyDelete

Print Friendly